History



  • Westwood begins calling the Port of Tacoma.

  • J-WeSco purchases Westwood Shipping Lines.



  • Westwood begins service from Portland to Japan.

  • Westwood begins regular monthly service to China.

  • Westwood and Star Shipping’s space-sharing and sailing agreement ends. Westwood charters three replacement vessels.

  • Westwood and Star Shipping initiate a space-sharing and sailing agreement.

  • Westwood begins regular service to Hitachinaka, Japan.

  • The Westwood Columbia, Westwood Victoria, and Westwood Olympia join the Westwood Rainier.

  • Westwood places order for new state-of-the-art vessels.

  • Westwood begins performing all sales and customer services in North America.



  • Westwood celebrates our first decade of transpacific shipping.

  • Westwood begins offering our own weekly eastbound container/breakbulk service when Gearbulk withdraws from transpacific container shipping.

  • Westwood withdraws from the north Europe market to focus on the strategically important transpacific market.

  • A joint sailing agreement is launched with Gearbulk Container Services to upgrade eastbound transpacific service to weekly frequency.

  • Westwood receives the first of five newly built, state-of-the-art "S" ships, the Westwood Marianne, under long-term contract with Saga Forest Carriers.

  • Transpacific service is upgraded to 10-day eastbound frequency with a Canadian Transport Company joint sailing agreement.



  • Full-fledged transpacific container/breakbulk service is inaugurated by Westwood with two "M" ships and two "J" ships.

  • Westwood begins a modest transpacific container operation in a joint venture with Hoegh.

  • Westwood Shipping Lines commences service with four "M" ships as a container/breakbulk common carrier between the North American West Coast and north Europe.

  • The Hoegh Mascot briefly strands on a Columbia River shoal caused by mud flow from the eruption of Mt. St. Helens.

  • Two new "J" ships enter service to carry newsprint from the newly opened Weyerhaeuser/Jujo NORPAC mill at Longview.

  • New ships enter service; Hoegh Container Lines is formed to provide combination container/breakbulk cargo service.

  • Weyerhaeuser contracts with Hoegh to build six open-hatch, gantry-crane vessels (second generation of "M" ships) to carry forest products to Europe.

  • Calmar Line ceases intercoastal service on which Weyerhaeuser was a major shipper.



  • The last two Weyerhaeuser Liberty ships are sold.

  • First set of "M" ships is chartered from Hoegh to carry forest products to Europe (Weyerhaeuser's first major charter contract for foreign shipping).

  • Weyerhaeuser Line headquarters moves from San Francisco to Tacoma.

  • Ships are chartered to carry finished forest products to Australia (the first Weyerhaeuser transportation of finished products to a foreign market).

  • Weyerhaeuser begins chartering logships to Japan following the Columbus Day 1962 windstorm, which left an abundance of fallen timber in the Northwest.



  • Weyerhaeuser Line is established after Weyerhaeuser Steamship becomes a division of Weyerhaeuser Company.

  • Six Liberty ships are rehabilitated in the most extensive Liberty ship reconstruction to date.

  • Pacific Coast Direct Line is purchased; Weyerhaeuser Steamship moves from Newark to San Francisco.

  • Four World War II Liberty ships purchased for Weyerhaeuser return to intercoastal service.

  • The Potlatch and the Heffron are sunk by torpedoes fired from German submarines.

  • Four ships are diverted on orders of the U.S. government to rush war supplies to British forces in Egypt; later, all eight of the company's vessels are requisitioned by the War Shipping Administration.



  • Weyerhaeuser Steamship Company establishes marine operations; headquarters moves from Tacoma to Newark, New Jersey.

  • Weyerhaeuser's first ocean shipping operation is launched with purchase of two freighters, the Pomona and the Hanley, to carry lumber from the Northwest to the East Coast.

  • Weyerhaeuser Timber Company is established at Tacoma, Washington, after 900,000 acres of Northwest timberlands are purchased.



  • The F. Weyerhaeuser, a 140-foot sternwheeler built for towing logs, is christened by Weyerhaeuser and Denkman Company (a Midwest Partnership).